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Single Responsibility Principle

by @julianrubisch julianrubisch

Especially when applying Stimulus to your application for the first time, it is tempting to write your controllers in a page controller style, resulting in a disjointed accumulation of unrelated functionality. Resist that temptation - try to write reusable controllers.

Below is a shortened juxtaposition of what that could look like.

Bad

<!-- page.html -->
<div data-controller="page">
  <form action="/" data-target="page.form"></form>
  <div data-target="page.modal" class="modal"></div>
</div> 
// page_controller.js
import { Controller } from "stimulus";

export default class extends Controller {
  static targets = ["modal", "form"];

  openModal() {
    this.modalTarget.classList.add("open");
  }

  submitForm() {
    this.formTarget.submit();
  }
}

Good

<!-- page.html -->
<div>
  <form action="/" data-controller="form"></form>
  <div data-controller="modal" class="modal"></div>
</div> 
// modal_controller.js
import { Controller } from "stimulus";

export default class extends Controller {
  open() {
    this.element.classList.add("open");
  }
}
// form_controller.js
import { Controller } from "stimulus";

export default class extends Controller {
  submit() {
    this.element.submit();
  }
}

Rationale

Books have been written about this very single topic, but let it be said that classes/modules that serve a single responsibility are

  1. easy to reuse - in our example above the page_controller can only be used on this very page (or one with the same structure), whereas modal_controller and form_controller could be used on any modal or form element, and
  2. easy to change - because every responsibility has a single point of realization, changes are cheap: instead of having to implement a new functionality in several places, there’s only one spot where you have to install the new behavior.

Reference